Phishing: 6 ways not to fall into the trap


The first thing you need to do is not do anything at all. Take the time to think things through before acting on an unexpected email.

St├ęphanie Gohier-Coulombe | Desjardins Group

You've probably already received a fraudulent email. So, how did you handle it? 

Even though 97%1 of people think they'd be able to recognize a fraudulent email, fraudsters still manage to scam many web users. Hard to believe, isn't it?

Why do we keep clicking?
People fall for scams for lots of reasons, including an emergency, a sudden problem or a potential gain. 

What should you do?
As strange as it may seem, the first thing you need to do is not do anything at all. Take the time to think things through before acting on an unexpected email.  

Then, if the email seems suspicious, follow these steps to confirm whether it's legitimate:
  • Check whether the sender's email address seems real and legitimate (especially the part after the @ sign)
  • Check if it's a business address or a personal address
  • Hover your mouse over the link (without clicking it) to check whether the address seems legitimate and matches the sender's company
  • Take a close look at the address--the suspicious address may look like a known address, but with one letter off
  • Consider why the email is prompting an urgent response
  • Review the content of the email carefully knowing that phishing emails won't necessarily have spelling mistakes
Remember that when in doubt, it's better not to click anything rather than falling into the trap. 

For more details, visit the Phishing section.

Desjardins has teamed up with National Bank and Laurentian Bank to create the ikeepitomyself site, an interactive experience that helps you protect yourself against banking fraud by keeping your personal information to yourself. 

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