From the big city to the islands!


Before moving into their new home, Loignon and her partner had never set foot on the Magdalen Islands.

Nathalie Slight | Journalist

She's only been in the Magdalen Islands a few months, but she's already talking about the archipelago with as much pride and enthusiasm as any Magdalen Islander.

At age 24, Vanessa Loignon left the big city to move to an island. And it's in that little piece of paradise that she founded her communications consulting business.

A defining moment
Once she had her B.A. in communications from Université Laval, Loignon was ready to take off. Her partner, a new police officer with the Sureté du Québec, was looking for a regional position.

It was when she attended 5@7 Découverte Gaspésie-îles-de-la-Madeleine, an event organized in Quebec City by Place aux jeunes en région, that she really fell in love with the Islands. She discovered everything they had to offer year-round residents. 

"The Place aux jeunes en région migration agent, who lives on the Islands, gave us tremendous support from there. She gave us a tour of our future apartment via Face Time, while we were still in Quebec City," says Loignon.

The agent also coordinated their move by helping them develop their network of contacts. Before moving into their new home, Loignon and her partner had never set foot on the Magdalen Islands.

"As soon as we saw the golden dunes, the sandy beaches and the endless turquoise ocean, we were hooked," she says.

Island life
Energetic Loignon loves living in the Magdalen Islands. "Here, you feel like you're on vacation 12 months of the year. It's far from the bustle of the city, there's no traffic, no stress, just endless nature as far as the eye can see!"

Since she moved to the Islands, Loignon has been living greener. A portion of the municipal taxes goes to waste transportation fees, so she's trying to take a "zero waste" approach by buying in bulk and learning more about composting.

"Buying local makes perfect sense when you live on an island. The people here make up a small, close-knit community, and everyone wants to help one another," she says.

Starting her own company
As soon as she arrived on the Magdalen Islands, Loignon noticed that many businesses weren't up to date with their communications. For example, business hours are often different from the ones listed on their websites. A detail that can cause frustration for tourists.

She started her own communications consulting business to lend her expertise to events and businesses in her adopted home.

"Everybody knows one another here! Thanks to word-of-mouth, it wasn't long before I landed my first contracts," she says. During the tourist season, from May to September, the Islands get 50,000 visitors, while we have about 11,000 residents year-round."

How does Loignon keep her communications business afloat during the cold season? "The pace is slower here in the winter, but I have no shortage of jobs, because I can do the work remotely,  no problem. I can very easily prepare a communications plan and discuss it with a client in Beauce or in Moncton via Skype," says the owner of Loignon Communication. 

To find out about the opportunities regional living offers, stop by the Salon de l'emploi et de la vie en région, on Thursday, February 8, 2018 in the Grande-Place at Complexe Desjardins in Montreal.

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All articles


Nathalie Slight | Journalist

She's only been in the Magdalen Islands a few months, but she's already talking about the archipelago with as much pride and enthusiasm as any Magdalen Islander.

At age 24, Vanessa Loignon left the big city to move to an island. And it's in that little piece of paradise that she founded her communications consulting business.

A defining moment
Once she had her B.A. in communications from Université Laval, Loignon was ready to take off. Her partner, a new police officer with the Sureté du Québec, was looking for a regional position.

It was when she attended 5@7 Découverte Gaspésie-îles-de-la-Madeleine, an event organized in Quebec City by Place aux jeunes en région, that she really fell in love with the Islands. She discovered everything they had to offer year-round residents. 

"The Place aux jeunes en région migration agent, who lives on the Islands, gave us tremendous support from there. She gave us a tour of our future apartment via Face Time, while we were still in Quebec City," says Loignon.

The agent also coordinated their move by helping them develop their network of contacts. Before moving into their new home, Loignon and her partner had never set foot on the Magdalen Islands.

"As soon as we saw the golden dunes, the sandy beaches and the endless turquoise ocean, we were hooked," she says.

Island life
Energetic Loignon loves living in the Magdalen Islands. "Here, you feel like you're on vacation 12 months of the year. It's far from the bustle of the city, there's no traffic, no stress, just endless nature as far as the eye can see!"

Since she moved to the Islands, Loignon has been living greener. A portion of the municipal taxes goes to waste transportation fees, so she's trying to take a "zero waste" approach by buying in bulk and learning more about composting.

"Buying local makes perfect sense when you live on an island. The people here make up a small, close-knit community, and everyone wants to help one another," she says.

Starting her own company
As soon as she arrived on the Magdalen Islands, Loignon noticed that many businesses weren't up to date with their communications. For example, business hours are often different from the ones listed on their websites. A detail that can cause frustration for tourists.

She started her own communications consulting business to lend her expertise to events and businesses in her adopted home.

"Everybody knows one another here! Thanks to word-of-mouth, it wasn't long before I landed my first contracts," she says. During the tourist season, from May to September, the Islands get 50,000 visitors, while we have about 11,000 residents year-round."

How does Loignon keep her communications business afloat during the cold season? "The pace is slower here in the winter, but I have no shortage of jobs, because I can do the work remotely,  no problem. I can very easily prepare a communications plan and discuss it with a client in Beauce or in Moncton via Skype," says the owner of Loignon Communication. 

To find out about the opportunities regional living offers, stop by the Salon de l'emploi et de la vie en région, on Thursday, February 8, 2018 inthe Grande-Place at Complexe Desjardins in Montreal.

You might also like to read:
Olivier and Roxanne: A small-town success story

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Commentaires publiés 1

Edgar Norman / January 24, 2018 5:40 PM
Very interesting adventure and I would appreciate more advertisements aswell and anymore educational topics.

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